Library Media Specialists Roles

One Bad Apple Does Spoil the Whole Bunch

I had the opportunity to talk to a high school teacher yesterday at my state tech conference.  After sometime we reached the subject of school libraries and librarians.  She told me that her school librarian was “good, but didn’t really like kids.”  I told her that I thought those two ideas were incompatible.  What did she mean when she said that her librarian was good?

Well, of course, she meant good in a stereotypical sense.  Her librarian kept the library neat and organized. These are not bad qualities, I told her, but they are the least important aspect of our jobs.

I welcomed the opportunity to explain to her the five ranked roles of today’s library media specialist: leader, instructional partner, information specialist, teacher and program administrator.  I suggested that if she ever wanted to see a real high school library in action, she should arrange to visit a particular library in a neighboring county, and I briefly explained that librarian’s philosophy.  She was very impressed with what I had to say.

And that’s the problem.  Library media programs such as the exemplary one I described should be closer to the norm than the one in this teacher’s school. Unfortunately, teachers and administrators only expect what they have experienced.  If all they have experienced is the archivist school library prototype, they have no reason to demand more.

Yes, I just hung an unknown colleague out to dry.  And I am not the least bit sorry.This bad apple does endanger the rest of us. Her lack of initiative to provide high quality library services and her clientele’s lack of expectations makes us vulnerable to job cuts. This is unacceptable.

As a profession we need to demand more of each other.  Nurturing only works with those who wish to be nurtured.  When that fails, it is time to call out those who are bringing us down. Further, if we cannot convince the librarian to step up her game, we need to inform her colleagues as to what they should expect. Carl Harvey II, a former AASL president, developed a list of attributes that teachers should expect of their school library media specialist. This is available in the February 2005 edition of School Library Media Connection.  The publisher grants permission for copying and distributing the document in the school in which you work. Use this to let your teachers know how valuable you are and can be. Then share the link in your newsletters and with your school and district administrators.

Harvey has also written a similar list for principals, but probably the most accessible information for principals is written by Doug Johnson.  Johnson’s work includes a  13 Point Library Media Program Checklist for School Principals that is a bit dated but still useful. Share this with your principal. Share it with your district office folks.

As a profession we have an obligation to educate our principals, teachers and parents as to what our roles in our children’s education actually should be.  And we need to call out both the librarian who falls short and the administrators who allow that to happen.

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1 thought on “One Bad Apple Does Spoil the Whole Bunch”

  1. Well stated and on point. It is a shame to see counties cutting librarians (and gasp! tossing out the collected books). Students need to be taught about copyright, citing sources, proper use of photos and other such things. It is hard for a subject classroom teacher to keep up with this ever changing field, but it is an excellent use of a library media specialist. Use them as an instructional partner prior to beginning a project so that students have no excuse not to “know” the rules.

    What you said about a bad apple applies to all fields….it’s time to step up to the 22nd century folks.

    Like

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